NEWS

PRESS RELEASE

A LIFETIME’S WORK

A photographic project to be unveiled in 2020 which celebrates and recognises diverse family businesses in the London Borough of Brent by a second-generation Jewish immigrant born to Moroccan parents has been awarded funding from the Brent 2020 Culture Fund. 

“A Lifetime’s Work” is one of the first 14 projects to be announced as part of Brent 2020 which sees Brent being London’s Borough of Culture in 2020.

Jude Wacks, a photographer, mental health campaigner and mother of 4 teenage daughters will be developing the photographic project that will celebrate and recognise the value that family businesses in Brent have played in their community and to the wider world.

(London, UK – August 29, 2019) –  A photographic exhibition that celebrates family businesses in the London Borough of Brent is to be one of the projects to be launched as part of the London Borough of Culture 2020, won by Brent.

A Lifetime’s Work is a photographic project focusing on families serving the community within Brent which celebrates and recognises the diversity of independent family businesses over generations that have played a major role to the local Brent community and to the wider world in the past, present and the future curated and photographed by local Brent photographer Jude Wacks.

Wacks, a photographer, mental health campaigner and mother of 4 teenage daughters said: “Family run businesses that that have been run from generation to generation are such an important fabric of Brent life. They are such an integral part of the community and deserve recognition for the valuable contribution they play to help, support and nurture it.”

Wacks added: “I moved to Brent, it’s people, places and environment celebrates and reflects the diversity and richness that makes up society and helps to develop and create such a positive identity for so many. As someone working in the visual arts, Brent has so much to offer that allows me as a photographer to develop my passion for photography as a way of visually communicating, celebrating and documenting people, places and issues.”

“The Brent 2020 programme is committed to supporting local artists, creatives, community groups and cultural organisations of all shapes and sizes,” says Lois Stonock, Artistic Director of London Borough of Culture 2020, won by Brent. “We want our year as the London Borough of Culture to promote engagement and participation in the arts through projects that shine a light on the stories, spirit and heritage of our communities, and showcase the character of the borough. We are delighted that A Lifetime’s Work will be supported by the 2020 Culture Fund and we look forward to sharing the project over 2020.”

Contact Jude Wacks
Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

 

About Jude Wacks

Born in the City of London, Wacks and her family moved to Brent 12 years ago and have brought up their 4 daughters in Dollis Hill. Wacks has taken her passion for photography as a way of visually communicating, celebrating and documenting people, places and issues.

In the 12 years Wacks has lived in the borough, she has witnessed many positive changes and developments in Brent, but has always appreciated and remained grateful to the community stalwarts who have, as independent traders have dedicated lifetimes to their communities and their vitality.

In 2017, Wacks went back to college and enrolled in a Graduate Diploma Photography one-year course at London College of Communications to further expand her photography skills and graduated in 2018.

Wacks is a second-generation immigrant of Jewish parents from Morocco.

Among her projects, Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, entitled ‘Best Days of Your Life’ and raising awareness across the UK of self-harm.

In 2018, Wacks held London exhibitions of ‘Best Days of Your Life’ allowing dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored openly.

In 2019, Wacks was shortlisted for the international Wellcome Trust Photography Prize and her shortlisted ‘Best Days Of Your Life’ portrait was exhibited at the Lethaby Gallery in London.

Wacks is a strong advocate for photo-therapy. During 2019 Wacks presented her research on the beneficial attributes of this to audiences including the RPS symposium day in Bristol dedicated to photo-therapy.

About Brent 2020

Brent will be London’s Borough of Culture in 2020. The programme will explore the stories, art and emotions that hold life in Brent together, uncovering and celebrating the borough’s untold tales and unheard voices. We are the home of Zadie Smith, reggae, English football and its captains. We have London’s oldest road, the biggest Hindu Temple in Europe, the Kiln Theatre and Mahogany Carnival Design. We are where city becomes Metroland; where roads, waterways and railways cross; where outsiders fight for their place. We are Jayaben Desai, George Michael, Cyrille Regis, Keith Moon, Rachel Yankey, Janet Kay, Twiggy, Bob Marley, Michael Meaney and Trojan Records. It is from this alchemy that our year of culture comes. Brent is more than a borough of culture: This is the Borough of Cultures. Visit for more information www.brent2020.co.uk.

About 2020 Culture Fund

The Brent 2020 Culture Fund is a £500,000 grant scheme supporting local people, organisations and groups in Brent to lead their own cultural activities as part of London Borough of Culture 2020. You don’t have to live or work in Brent to apply, but you need to be working in partnership with local artists, community groups or organisations. Individuals can apply for grants up to £3,000 and organisations can apply for grants up to £10,000. The 2020 Culture Fund supports arts and cultural activities including events, performances, workshops, exhibitions, talks, walks, installations, festivals, carnivals, screenings and participatory projects of all shapes and sizes and across all art forms.


PRESS RELEASE

BEST DAYS OF YOUR LIFE

A series of photographs exploring the alarming rise of adolescent self harm in the UK including one that was shortlisted for the international Wellcome Photography PrIze 2019, will be on display in Blackpool at HIVE during September as part of an exhibition showcasing work by female photographers as part of a Royal Photographic Society initiative in which female photographers explore the theme of identity.

Best Days Of Your Life features a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers and is the first time publicly shown outside London.

(Blackpool, UK – August 12, 2019) –  Best Days of Your Life, by photographer, campaigner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks looks at the alarming increase in teenage mental health issues in the UK and is part of the Representation on the Line III: (Un)framing Our Identities exhibition taking place at HIVE Blackpool, 80-82 Church Street, Blackpool,FY1 1HP which is open daily to the public daily from 11am to 4pm.

Since October 2017, Wacks, has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

This is the first-time outside London that Wacks has exhibited her photography. Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored. In May 2019, Wacks’ work was showcased during the month in the run up to and after Mental Health Awareness Week at the Head Room Café in London operated by mental health charity Jami.

“I am grateful to be able to bring Best Days Of Your Life to Blackpool and to help raise further awareness of how self harm is affecting and impacting young people and their families,” Wacks says.

Best Days Of Your Life is a photographic project that seeks to explore and offer an insight and provide the means for discussion into the ‘epidemic’ of mental health issues that our society faces both locally and globally with the rise of self-harm among adolescents.

“Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a daily basis through self-harm,” Wacks adds. “Stress, pressure, bullying and social media have been identified as factors in this, yet on the surface  our children appear to be coping and maintaining a brave face. Deep down however, their true emotions are hidden.”

Wacks herself is acutely aware of youth self-harm and the impact it has on the child, their family and friends.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

Wacks has used photo therapy as a way in which the subject matters have opened up and in turn have found a way for them to express themselves.

“Through photo-therapy techniques, I immersed myself with the subjects to enable them to open up, reveal and disclose with confidence their feelings and emotions and to show the world their empowerment to redefine themselves and move forward with their lives,” Wacks says.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness.

“I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said.

Throughout this project, Wacks also questions the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation. “Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” she added.

Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Contact Jude Wacks
Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

Jude Wacks is a London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of four teenage daughters. Since 2017, and graduating with a photography degree in 2018 from London College of Communications, Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, entitled ‘Best Days of Your Life’ and raising awareness across the UK of self-harm.

In 2018, Wacks held London exhibitions of ‘Best Days of Your Life’ allowing dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored openly.

In 2019, Wacks was shortlisted for the international Wellcome Trust Photography Prize and her shortlisted ‘Best Days Of Your Life’ portrait was exhibited at the Lethaby Gallery in London.

Wacks is a strong advocate for photo-therapy. During 2019 Wacks presented her research on the beneficial attributes of this to audiences including the RPS symposium day in Bristol dedicated to photo-therapy.


PRESS RELEASE

BEST DAYS OF YOUR LIFE 

To mark Mental Health Awareness Week in May, London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of 4 teenage daughters, Jude Wacks will be raising awareness of the growth in youth self-harm through a photographic exhibition taking place in London and delivering a public talk on May 13 with her daughter.

Best Days Of Your Life explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – April 30, 2019) – Since October 2017, Londoner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

With Mental Health Awareness Week taking place from May 13 to May 19, Wacks will be exhibiting her work in association with mental health charity Jami, at the Head Room Café in Golders Green, north west London.  Wacks along with her daughter will also be leading an open discussion at Head Room Cafe on May 13 on how self-harm has impacted her own family.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Mental Health Awareness Week provides an opportunity for those who wish to understand more about this. Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

This is the third time Wacks has exhibited her photography. Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored.

At both London’s Old Truman Brewery in the East End and LCC in Elephant & Castle, those visiting were moved by the pictures and stories of what are ordinary looking children in their late teens who have been self-harming for many years and relating their own experiences to the subject matter.

The UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues with stress, pressure, bullying and social media identified as factors. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed throughout their secondary school education and plans to add further sixth formers and school leavers to be photographed and have their stories told.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers within. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness.

“I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. Throughout this project, Wacks also questions the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation. “Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” she added.

Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Contact Jude Wacks
Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks
Jude Wacks is a London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of four teenage daughters. Since 2017 Jude has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, entitled ‘Best Days of Your Life’.

In 2018, the first two public London exhibitions of ‘Best Days of Your Life’ allowed dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored openly.

On May 13th, Wacks and her daughter Ellie, will be at the Head Room Café for an evening of conversation and will be exhibiting ‘Best Days of Your Life’ at the Head Room Café throughout May.

Jude Wacks’ work can be viewed at www.judewacks.com

About Jami
For 30 years Jami has been providing practical and emotional support for the mental health needs of the Jewish community – delivering services that enable independence and build resilience through Community Hubs and Outreach; Education and Training and Bespoke recovery support plans. Jami helps over 1,300 people annually, those with mental illness and their family and friends.

Statistics show that 25% of us may be experiencing a diagnosable mental health problem at any one time.

Jami supports everyone affected by a mental health problem and believes it is possible for someone to regain a meaningful life despite severe mental ill health.

For more information on Jami visit: www.jamiuk.org


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life

As self-harm and mental health issues face school children, Jude Wacks, London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of a teenage daughter who self-harmed, is looking to further raise awareness of the growth in youth self-harm which is impacting schoolchildren across the country and is fuelled by social media

Jude Wacks, London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of a teenage daughter who self-harmed, is raising awareness of the growth in youth self-harm which is impacting schoolchildren across the country and which is also fuelled by social media Wacks has curated and presented the UK’s first photography project which explores adolescent self-harm. Best Days Of Your Life explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers and had its debut during summer 2018. Wacks is now looking to expand Best Days Of Your Life and to further exhibit it.

(London, UK – January 30 , 2019) – Since October 2017, Londoner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

Wacks herself is acutely aware of youth self-harm and the impact it has on the child, their family and friends.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

Wacks has used her experience of the issue and has become a leading advocate and campaigner for greater awareness.

Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored.

At both London’s Old Truman Brewery in the East End and LCC in Elephant & Castle, those visiting were moved by the pictures and stories of what are ordinary looking children in their late teens who have been self-harming for many years and relating their own experiences to the subject matter.

Following this, Wacks is looking to take the photography project further so that more young people and their stories can be documented and is looking to collaborate with relevant organisations and groups in order to expand Best Days Of Your Life, its reach and impact.

The UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues with stress, pressure, bullying and social media identified as factors. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed throughout their secondary school education and plans to add further sixth formers and school leavers to be photographed and have their stories told.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers within. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added. “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Throughout this project, Wacks also question the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation. Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email: jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

A mother of 4 daughters, Wacks has taken her passion for photography as a way of visually communicating and documenting causes and concerns.

In 2017, Wacks went back to college and enrolled in a Graduate Diploma Photography one-year course at LCC to further expand her photography skills and graduated in 2018.

Wacks hopes through Best Days Of Your Life, she will be able to help raise awareness of adolescent mental health and the issues they go through, by providing a platform, for open dialogue and education and prevention.


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life – Self-harm and mental health issues continue to face school children as they break up for Christmas holidays

As children and young people are set to break up from school for their Christmas holidays in the coming weeks, Jude Wacks, London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of a teenage daughter who self-harmed, is looking to further raise awareness of the growth in youth self-harm which is impacting schoolchildren across the country.  Wacks, who exhibited her photography project Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018 aims to expand her photography exhibition which explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – December 11, 2018) – Since October 2017, Londoner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

With Christmas and New Year holidays fast approaching, it’s a time of increased stress and pressure on young people as Wacks explains:

“The Christmas season is one where people are often at their most emotionally vulnerable and yet, the support out there for young people just doesn’t exist, or if it is there can be very difficult to access,” Wacks says.

“Whatever limited support they may get in school they will now be without,” Wacks added. “The essential support our children need and deserve is very hard to come by and while schools have started to combat this with education, what happens when children are off school during the holidays as there is greatly reduced support which impacts

Wacks herself is acutely aware of youth self-harm and the impact it has on the child, their family and friends.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

Wacks has used her experience of the issue and has become a leading advocate and campaigner for greater awareness.

Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored.

At both London’s Old Truman Brewery in the East End and LCC in Elephant & Castle, those visiting were moved by the pictures and stories of what are ordinary looking children in their late teens who have been self-harming for many years and relating their own experiences to the subject matter.

Following this, Wacks is looking to take the photography project further so that more young people and their stories can be documented and is looking to collaborate with relevant organisations and groups in order to expand Best Days Of Your Life, its reach and impact.

The UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues with stress, pressure, bullying and social media identified as factors. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed throughout their secondary school education and plans to add further sixth formers and school leavers to be photographed and have their stories told.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers within. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Throughout this project, Wacks also question the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation.  Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

A mother of 4 daughters, Wacks has taken her passion for photography as a way of visually communicating and documenting causes and concerns.

In 2017, Wacks went back to college and enrolled in a Graduate Diploma Photography one-year course at LCC to further expand her photography skills and graduated in 2018.

Wacks hopes through Best Days Of Your Life, she will be able to help raise awareness of adolescent mental health and the issues they go through, by providing a platform, for open dialogue and education and prevention.


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life – Self-harm and mental health issues continue to face school children as they break up for Christmas holidays

As children and young people are set to break up from school for their Christmas holidays in the coming weeks, Jude Wacks, London-based photographer, campaigner and mother of a teenage daughter who self-harmed, is looking to further raise awareness of the growth in youth self-harm which is impacting schoolchildren across the country.  Wacks, who exhibited her photography project Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018 aims to expand her photography exhibition which explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – December 11, 2018) – Since October 2017, Londoner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

With Christmas and New Year holidays fast approaching, it’s a time of increased stress and pressure on young people as Wacks explains:

“The Christmas season is one where people are often at their most emotionally vulnerable and yet, the support out there for young people just doesn’t exist, or if it is there can be very difficult to access,” Wacks says.

“Whatever limited support they may get in school they will now be without,” Wacks added. “The essential support our children need and deserve is very hard to come by and while schools have started to combat this with education, what happens when children are off school during the holidays as there is greatly reduced support which impacts

Wacks herself is acutely aware of youth self-harm and the impact it has on the child, their family and friends.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

Wacks has used her experience of the issue and has become a leading advocate and campaigner for greater awareness.

Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored.

At both London’s Old Truman Brewery in the East End and LCC in Elephant & Castle, those visiting were moved by the pictures and stories of what are ordinary looking children in their late teens who have been self-harming for many years and relating their own experiences to the subject matter.

Following this, Wacks is looking to take the photography project further so that more young people and their stories can be documented and is looking to collaborate with relevant organisations and groups in order to expand Best Days Of Your Life, its reach and impact.

The UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues with stress, pressure, bullying and social media identified as factors. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed throughout their secondary school education and plans to add further sixth formers and school leavers to be photographed and have their stories told.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers within. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

 

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Throughout this project, Wacks also question the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation.  Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

A mother of 4 daughters, Wacks has taken her passion for photography as a way of visually communicating and documenting causes and concerns.

In 2017, Wacks went back to college and enrolled in a Graduate Diploma Photography one-year course at LCC to further expand her photography skills and graduated in 2018.

Wacks hopes through Best Days Of Your Life, she will be able to help raise awareness of adolescent mental health and the issues they go through, by providing a platform, for open dialogue and education and prevention.

 


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life – Self harm and mental health issues facing children as they go back to school

As children and young people go back to school following their summer breaks, London-based photographer Jude Wacks is looking to further raise awareness of the growth in youth self-harm which is impacting schoolchildren across the country.  Wacks, who exhibited her photography project Best Days Of Your Life during the summer aims to expand her photography exhibition which explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – August 29, 2018) – Since October 2017, Londoner and mother of four teenage daughters, Jude Wacks has been exploring the theme of youth self-harm in a powerful set of photographs, which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what the consequences are for both society and the individuals concerned of ignoring this invisible illness.

“As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families,” Wacks said. “Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues during secondary school years, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness of this and give the silent pain a personal voice.”

Her first two public exhibitions of Best Days Of Your Life during summer 2018, allowed for dialogue of the often taboo topic of self-harm amongst our schoolchildren, to be discussed and explored.

At both London’s Old Truman Brewery in the East End and LCC in Elephant & Castle, those visiting were moved by the pictures and stories of what are ordinary looking children in their late teens who have been self-harming for many years and relating their own experiences to the subject matter.

Following this, Wacks is looking to take the photography project further so that more young people and their stories can be documented and is looking to collaborate with relevant organisations and groups in order to expand Best Days Of Your Life, its reach and impact.

The UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues with stress, pressure, bullying and social media identified as factors. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed throughout their secondary school education and plans to add further sixth formers and school leavers to be photographed and have their stories told.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers within. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of hiding or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Throughout this project, Wacks also question the observers’ choice of visual clarity when ‘seeing’ our children and their scarred generation.  Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we perceive, relate to, confront and address this issue?” Wacks also strives to challenge the taboo and stigma of self-harm to both sufferer and their families.

Best Days Of Your Life is a strong social documentary of a very real and current situation affecting our youth and schools today.

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  jude@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Twitter: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

A mother of 4 daughters, Wacks has taken her passion for photography as a way of visually communicating and documenting causes and concerns.

In 2017, Wacks went back to college and enrolled in a Graduate Diploma Photography one-year course at LCC to further expand her photography skills and graduated in 2018.

Wacks hopes through Best Days Of Your Life, she will be able to help raise awareness of adolescent mental health and the issues they go through, by providing a platform, for open dialogue and education and prevention.

 


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life

Following last month’s success at LCC Degree Shows 2018, The Truman Brewery in east London as part of Free Range 2018, will be hosting Jude Wacks’ much talked about Best Days Of Your Life photography exhibition which explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – June 7, 2018) – In recent years the UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Stress, pressure, bullying and social media have been identified as factors in this, yet on the surface children appear to be coping and maintaining a brave face. Deep down however, they hide their true feelings, emotional pain and humiliation, with worrying consequences as they seek a “way out” of their situation.

Since October 2017, Londoner, Jude Wacks – herself a mother of teenage daughters – has been exploring the theme of youth self harm in a powerful set of photos which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what are the consequences of ignoring this invisible illness.

For Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed themselves throughout their secondary school education.

The reasons, like these individuals are diverse – a cry for help, a release from inner pain or to get attention through fear of not being loved or wanted.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers inside of them. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of covering-up or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Through this project I am questioning the observers’ choice of awareness level and how they can interpret what is shown before them. Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we relate to, confront and address the issue?”

Best Days Of Your Life is on at The Truman Brewery, Brick Lane, London, E1 6QR from 21st June 2018 – 25th June 2018.

Private View: Thursday 21st June, 6pm – 10pm.
Public View: Friday 22nd June – Sunday 24th June, 10am – 7pm.
Public View: Monday 25th June 10am – 4pm.
Free and open to all

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  exhibition@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families. Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness and give the silent pain a personal voice.

 


PRESS RELEASE

Best Days Of Your Life

A new photographic exhibition at the London College of Communication from 30th May 2018 – 2nd June 2018 by Jude Wacks explores a group of 18 to 20 year-olds who have all self-harmed throughout their secondary school careers

(London, UK – May 21, 2018) – In recent years the UK has faced an alarming increase in teenage mental health issues. Across the country and affecting all socio-economic demographics, gender and ethnicities, children are being hospitalised on a worrying daily basis through self-harm.

Stress, pressure, bullying and social media have been identified as factors in this, yet on the surface children appear to be coping and maintaining a brave face. Deep down however, they hide their true feelings, emotional pain and humiliation, with worrying consequences as they seek a “way out” of their situation.

Since October 2017, Londoner, Jude Wacks – herself a mother of teenage daughters – has been exploring the theme of youth self harm in a powerful set of photos which helps to expose the issue, the children who try to cover up their actions and what are the consequences of ignoring this invisible illness.

For Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks has gathered a diverse group of sixth formers and school leavers who have one thing in common: they have self-harmed themselves throughout their secondary school education.

The reasons, like these individuals are diverse – a cry for help, a release from inner pain or to get attention through fear of not being loved or wanted.

“At first glance they seem to be an average looking group of late teens,” Wacks said. “But when you start capturing them on film and talking to them, you can see the pain that lingers inside of them. Sometimes it is obvious, often there are subtle nuances in their appearance and outlook that provide an indication as to how they feel”.

“We can never be sure at first glance how far down the path they’ve gone to self-harming,” Wacks added.  “It’s only by talking and listening that we can try to figure out what issues these teens may face”.

Through Best Days Of Your Life, Wacks aims to question the wider mental health balance of exposure and awareness. “I’m trying to examine the intimate choice of covering-up or revealing the invisible pain these teenagers have,” Wacks said. “Through this project I am questioning the observers’ choice of awareness level and how they can interpret what is shown before them. Whether it is our own children or other people’s, how do we relate to, confront and address the issue?”

Best Days Of Your Life is on at the London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle, SE1 6SB from 30th May 2018 – 2nd June 2018 and is part of LCC Degree Shows 2018.

Private View: Wednesday 30 May, 6-9pm,
Public View: Thursday 31 May – Friday 1 June, 11am-7pm,
Public View: Saturday 2 June 11am-6pm.
Free and open to all

Website: www.judewacks.com
Email:  exhibition@judewacks.com
Instagram: judewacks
Tel : 020 7193 5781

About Jude Wacks

As a parent of a teenage daughter, who has grappled with mental health issues for a number of years, I have experienced first-hand the pain and trauma that self-harm causes to both the sufferer and their families. Throughout my personal experience and exposure to adolescent mental health issues, I began to realise how wide spread self-harm has become, but yet still very much a taboo. Through this project I hope to raise awareness and give the silent pain a personal voice.